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Categories: Sauces and condiments, Vegetarian

Chipotle Ketchup

It's summer, and that means a new crop of barbecue books. One that stands out is "Legends of Texas Barbecue Cook Book: Recipes and Recollections from the Pit Bosses" by Robb Walsh (Chronicle Books, $18.95). It includes plenty of recipes, ... Read more

Total time: 25 minutes | Makes about 4 cups
Note: This recipe comes from Art Blondin, barbecue cook-off competitor and owner of Artz Rib House in Austin, Texas, from "Legends of Texas Barbecue Cook Book." If using canned chipotle chiles packed in adobo sauce, remove the seeds and stems and add them to the food processor with the other chiles.
  • 3 dried chipotle chiles
  • 3 ancho chiles
  • 3 guajillo or pasilla chiles
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar, packed
  • 2 tablespoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon Mexican oregano
  • 2 cups tomato paste
  • Salt, pepper

Step 1Remove the seeds and stems from the chipotle, ancho and guajillo chiles. Place the chiles, onion and garlic in a large saucepan and cover with plenty of water. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer 15 minutes.

Step 2With a slotted spoon, transfer the chiles, onion and garlic to a food processor, reserving the liquid. Add the brown sugar, cumin, oregano, tomato paste and 1 cup of the reserved chile liquid. Puree, adding more of the chile liquid until the ketchup reaches the desired thickness. Add salt and pepper to taste. Tightly sealed in a glass jar, the ketchup will keep refrigerated for several months.

Each tablespoon:
16 calories; 71 mg sodium; 0 cholesterol; 0 fat; 0 saturated fat; 4 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram protein; 0.91 gram fiber.
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