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Category: Sauces and condiments

Hot pickle mix

Hot pickle mix
Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Seems like we waited forever for great summer produce, and now it's abundantly here -- too abundantly, if you're a fruit-tree owner, overly enthusiastic vegetable gardener or incorrigible farmers market shopper. Got plums, ripening all at once? Neighbors with zucchini ... Read more

Total time: 1 hour | Makes about 6 pint jars
Note: From "Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving." A canner is a large lidded pot with a rack that holds jars upright. You may substitute kosher salt for pickling salt; check the package for equivalencies. Pickle fruits and vegetables within 24 hours of harvest. These are fresh-pack or quick-process pickles and should be stored for 4 to 6 weeks in a cool, dry, dark place before eating.
  • 4 cups (about 1 pound) pickling cucumbers, trimmed and sliced (1/4 -inch slices)
  • 2 cups cauliflower florets
  • 1 green pepper, seeded and cut into strips
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into strips
  • 1 cup sliced peeled carrots
  • 1 cup peeled pearl or pickling onions
  • 2/3 cup pickling or canning salt
  • 3 cups sliced seeded hot yellow banana peppers (about 6 peppers)
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 8 1/2 cups white vinegar
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
  • 3 to 9 jalapeno peppers, halved and seeded

Step 1In a large glass or stainless steel bowl, combine the cucumbers, cauliflower, green and red peppers, carrots and onions.

Step 2In another large glass or stainless steel bowl, dissolve the pickling salt in 7 cups water. Pour it over the vegetables. Cover and let stand at room temperature for 1 hour.

Step 3Meanwhile, prepare the canner, jars and lids by washing and rinsing the jars and lids, placing a rack in the bottom of a boiling-water canner and placing the jars in the rack, adding water to fill and cover the jars. Cover the canner and bring water to a simmer (boiling the jars or pre-sterilization is unnecessary); keep the jars hot until ready to use.

Step 4In a colander placed over a sink, drain the vegetables. Rinse with cold running water and drain thoroughly. Add the hot yellow peppers and mix well.

Step 5In a large stainless steel saucepan, combine the garlic, 1 1/2 cups water, vinegar, sugar and horseradish. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Reduce the heat and boil gently for 15 minutes, until the liquid is infused with garlic flavor. Discard the garlic clove.

Step 6Pack the vegetables and 1 to 3 jalapeno pepper halves into hot jars to within a generous one-half inch of the top of the jar. Ladle hot pickling liquid into the jar to cover the vegetables, leaving one-half inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust the headspace, if necessary, by adding hot pickling liquid. Wipe the rim. Center the lid on the jar. Screw the band down until resistance is met, then increase to fingertip-tight.

Step 7Place the jars in the canner, ensuring they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil and process for 10 minutes. Remove the canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then remove the jars, cool and store for 4 to 6 weeks before serving to allow the flavors to develop.

Each serving of one-fourth pint:
72 calories; 1 gram protein; 16 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram fiber; 0 fat; 0 saturated fat; 0 cholesterol; 400 mg. sodium.
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