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Category: Sauces and condiments

Spiced whole kumquats

Spiced whole kumquats
Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

"People's tastes change," says Richard Ward of Sierra Madre's E. Waldo Ward & Son Inc. "My dad used to make lots of pickled watermelon. But people don't use as much sugar as they used to." His son Jeff nods. "But ... Read more

Total time: 2 hours, 10 minutes plus standing time | Makes about 6 cups
Note: Adapted from a recipe by E. Waldo Ward & Son Inc. Serve the kumquats warm with a little of the reserved juices, either alone or with roast pork or other rich meats.
  • 2 1/2 pounds kumquats, about 3 (12-ounce) pints
  • 7 cups sugar, divided
  • 1 1/2 ounces cinnamon sticks, about 12 (3-inch sticks), broken to bits
  • Scant 1/4 cup whole allspice
  • 1 tablespoon whole cloves
  • 3/4 cup white vinegar

Step 1Make a small horizontal slit in the top of each kumquat (over the stem end), no more than one-fourth-inch deep. This will allow the marinade to permeate the entire fruit.

Step 2Place the fruit along with 3 quarts water in a large soup or stock pot over medium-high heat. Gently simmer until tender, about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Step 3Drain the water out of the pot, and add 3 cups fresh water. Stir in a generous 1 3/4 cups sugar and heat the mixture over medium heat. Cook until a thermometer inserted reads 200 degrees, or until the mixture barely begins to simmer, stirring occasionally. Be careful that the mixture does not come to a boil. Remove from the heat and set aside overnight.

Step 4Repeat the process two more times, draining the syrup and adding another generous 1 3/4 cups of sugar with 3 cups fresh water.

Step 5Make the spice infusion: In a medium saucepan, combine one-half quart of water with the cinnamon, allspice and cloves over high heat. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Strain and set aside.

Step 6Drain the kumquats and add the remaining sugar, with 3 cups water, one-fourth cup of the spice mix, and the vinegar. Heat the mixture until a thermometer inserted reads 200 degrees; remove from the heat. At this point, the kumquats can be refrigerated, covered, for several weeks, or canned according to the canning-product manufacturer's instructions.

Each quarter cup:
45 calories; 0 protein; 11 grams carbohydrates; 2 grams fiber; 0 fat; 0 cholesterol; 2 mg. sodium.
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